Worcester Road Sewer Pump Station rehabilitation

  1. Project Overview
  2. Project Update
  3. Photos

The Worcester Road Pumping Station is Framingham's second-largest wastewater station, responsible for collecting and pumping sewage for over 4,000 homes and more than 200 businesses. The station provides service to approximately 25% of the city. Originally constructed in 1963, the station's equipment is outdated, does not meet current DPW standards, does not have a full back-up power supply, and is at the end of its reliable service life. The pump station also does not meet current building codes, and the superstructure, including the roof, has structural deficiencies and will need replacement to extend the building’s life. 

Existing conditions include:

  • Inefficient and deteriorated pumps and drives that will need to be replaced soon.
  • No flow metering (measurement of the amount of wastewater being pumped from the pump station or flowing into the station)  
  • Antiquated monitoring and control systems, not meeting City standards.
  • Minimal standby power capabilities in cases of emergencies, losing pump capacity during power outages.
  • An old electrical system, which requires significant modifications to bring it up to code.
  • An outdated HVAC system with no odor control for the exhaust air.
  • Superstructure deficiencies, including insufficiently reinforced blocks in the walls and a roof in very poor condition 

The project will:

  • Replace inefficient aged pumps and piping
  • Re-build the above-ground structure including, walls, windows, doors, and a new roof
  • Upgrade the Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition (SCADA) controls to bring them up to current DPW standards to enable improved monitoring of systems, enhance reliability, provide detailed records of pumped flows, and alert operators when emergencies need to be addressed and when programmed maintenance is required.
  • Upgrade the outdated electrical system. 
  • Update the HVAC system and add odor control to the exhaust.
  • Install a new emergency power standby generator to provide full electrical back-up when the station's electrical supply is lost.

Once completed, the pump station will operate far into the future and work much more efficiently and reliably. The rehabilitation will also enable increased sewer capacity and reduce the potential for the generation of corrosive sulfide compounds.